One World Realty in Jacksonville Florida
Charles Gaulden
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How to Choose Stock Kitchen Cabinets

Buying stock cabinets for your kitchen remodel can definitely save you money. Here are some tips to help you make the right buying decision.

Stock cabinets save you time because you don’t have to wait for them to be built. And they save you money because you aren’t paying for customizations.
But that doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice quality. You just need to know what to look for.

What to Look For

  • Solid wood and plywood cabinets. They’ll give you better longevity and crisper details than pressed wood.
  • Walls at least ½-inch thick. They’re more sturdy.
  • Consistency of finish. Lesser quality cabinets often have irregular finishes and colors from one cabinet box to the next.
  • Full-extension hardware. It allows you to open drawers all the way and open doors almost 180 degrees to make access easier.
  • Dovetail joinery. Or a metal box. Drawer sides and backs that are stapled together won’t last as long.

Cost and Installation

The cost of quality stock cabinets for an average-sized kitchen generally runs $8,000 to $10,000. Semi-custom cabinets would cost about twice that. And full custom cabinets would cost even more.

There are some lower-cost stock alternatives, such as IKEA (as low as $2,500), but you’ll offset your savings with the hassle of difficult assembly — fine if you have the patience and skill.

But unless you’ve got professional building experience, actually installing kitchen cabinets isn’t a typical DIY job.

So carve out $100 to $300 per cabinet (depending on labor rates in your area) to have them professionally installed.

The Drawbacks of Stock Cabinets

  • Finish and color choices are limited. The most likely options are painted white, natural wood, or stained maple and cherry.
  • Stock cabinets are only 36 inches tall. If you want taller cabinets, you’ll have to go semi-custom, which can take you up to 42 inches.
  • You could lose potential storage space. Filler strips are used to cover gaps created when the stock sizes don’t quite fill the space — whereas custom cabinets can be measured to take advantage of all space.
  • Extra details such as crown molding aren’t included. Mitered corners and furniture-style sides aren’t included either. However, you can add crown molding yourself later if you choose.
  • Warranties are limited. The industry standard is about 5 years, and they only cover product failure, not wear and tear.

Note: You’ll also need to choose hardware. But that can be a fun project to really personalize your kitchen.
Get more tips on planning a kitchen remodel.
Read more:  http://members.houselogic.com/articles/how-choose-stock-kitchen-cabinets/preview/#ixzz2vThiq6Ih Follow us: @houselogic on Twitter | houselogic on Facebook

7 Smart Strategies for Kitchen Remodeling

Follow these seven strategies to get the most financial gain on your kitchen remodel.

A significant portion of kitchen remodeling costs may be recovered by the value the project brings to your home. Kitchen remodels in the $50,000 to $60,000 range recoup about 74% of the initial project cost at the home’s resale, according to recent data from Remodeling Magazine’s Cost vs. Value Report.

A minor kitchen remodel of about $19,000 does even better, returning more than 82% of your investment.

To maximize your return on investment, follow these seven strategies to keep you on budget and help you make smart choices.
1. Plan, Plan, Plan

Planning your kitchen remodel should take more time than the actual construction. If you plan well, the amount of time you’re inconvenienced by construction mayhem will be minimized. Plus, you’re more likely to stay on budget.
How much time should you spend planning? The National Kitchen and Bath Association recommends at least six months. That way, you won’t be tempted to change your mind during construction and create change orders, which will inflate construction costs and hurt your return on investment.
Some tips on planning:
Study your existing kitchen: How wide is the doorway into your kitchen? It’s a common mistake many homeowners make: Buying the extra-large fridge only to find they can’t get it in the doorway. To avoid mistakes like this, create a drawing of your kitchen with measurements for doorways, walkways, counters, etc. And don’t forget height, too.

Think about traffic patterns: Work aisles should be a minimum of 42 inches wide and at least 48

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inches wide for households with multiple cooks.

Design with ergonomics in mind: Drawers or pull-out shelves in base cabinets; counter heights that can adjust up or down; a wall oven instead of a range: These are all features that make a kitchen accessible to everyone — and a pleasure to work in.

Related: Test Your Ergonomic Design Knowledge

Plan for the unforeseeable: Even if you’ve planned down to the number of nails you’ll need in your remodel, expect the unexpected. Build in a little leeway for completing the remodel. Want it done by Thanksgiving? Then plan to be done before Halloween.

Choose all your fixtures and materials before starting: Contractors will be able to make more accurate bids, and you’ll lessen the risk of delays because of back orders.

Don’t be afraid to seek help: A professional designer can simplify your kitchen remodel. Pros help make style decisions, foresee potential problems, and schedule contractors. Expect fees around $50 to $150 per hour, or 5% to 15% of the total cost of the project.

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Keep the same footprint Get real about appliances Don’t underestimate the power of lighting Be quality-conscious Add storage, not space Communicate clearly with your remodelers

2. Keep the Same Footprint

Nothing will drive up the cost of a remodel faster than changing the location of plumbing pipes and electrical outlets, and knocking down walls. This is usually where unforeseen problems occur.
So if possible, keep appliances, water fixtures, and walls in the same location. 

Not only will you save on demolition and reconstruction costs, you’ll cut the amount of dust and debris your project generates.

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Plan, plan, plan Get real about appliances Don’t underestimate the power of lighting Be quality-conscious Add storage, not space Communicate clearly with your remodelers

3. Get Real About Appliances

It’s easy to get carried away when planning your new kitchen. A six-burner commercial-grade range and luxury-brand refrigerator may make eye-catching centerpieces, but they may not fit your cooking needs or lifestyle.
Appliances are essentially tools used to cook and store food. Your kitchen remodel shouldn’t be about the tools, but the design and functionality of the entire kitchen.
So unless you’re an exceptional cook who cooks a lot, concentrate your dollars on long-term features that add value, such as cabinets and flooring.
Then choose appliances made by trusted brands that have high marks in online reviews and Consumer Reports.

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Plan, plan, plan Keep the same footprint Don’t underestimate the power of lighting Be quality-conscious Add storage, not space Communicate clearly with your remodelers

4. Don’t Underestimate the Power of Lighting

Lighting can make a world of difference in a kitchen. It can make it look larger and brighter. And it will help you work safely and efficiently. You should have two different types of lighting in your kitchen:   Task Lighting: Under-cabinet lighting should be on your must-do list, since cabinets create such dark work areas. And since you’re remodeling, there won’t be a better time to hard-wire your lights. (Here’s more about under-cabinet lights.) Plan for at least two fixtures per task area to eliminate shadows. Pendant lights are good for islands and other counters without low cabinets. Recessed lights and track lights work well over sinks and general prep areas with no cabinets overhead.

Ambient lighting: Flush-mounted ceiling fixtures, wall sconces, and track lights create overall lighting in your kitchen. Include dimmer switches to control intensity and mood.

Related: How to Choose the Best Bulb for the Job

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Plan, plan, plan Keep the same footprint Get real about appliances Be quality-conscious Add storage, not space Communicate clearly with your remodelers

5. Be Quality-Conscious

Functionality and durability should be top priorities during kitchen remodeling. Resist low-quality bargains, and choose products that combine low maintenance with long warranty periods. Solid-surface countertops, for instance, may cost a little more, but with the proper care, they’ll look great for a long time.
And if you’re planning on moving soon, products with substantial warranties are a selling advantage.

Related:

Kitchen Remodeling Decisions You’ll Never Regret

White: The Savvy and Chic Kitchen Color Choice

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Plan, plan, plan Keep the same footprint Get real about appliances Don’t underestimate the power of lighting Add storage, not space Communicate clearly with your remodelers

6. Add Storage, Not Space

Storage will never go out of style, but if you’re sticking with the same footprint, here are a couple of ideas to add more:
Install cabinets that reach the ceiling: They may cost more — and you might need a stepladder — but you’ll gain valuable storage space for Christmas platters and other once-a-year items. In addition, you won’t have to dust cabinet tops.
Hang it up: Mount small shelving units on unused wall areas and inside cabinet doors; hang stock pots and large skillets on a ceiling-mounted rack; and add hooks to the backs of closet doors for aprons, brooms, and mops.

Related: Storage Options that Pack More Space in Your Kitchen

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Plan, plan, plan Keep the same footprint Get real about appliances Don’t underestimate the power of lighting Be quality-conscious Communicate clearly with your remodelers

7. Communicate Clearly With Your Remodelers

Establishing a good rapport with your project manager or construction team is essential for staying on budget. To keep the sweetness in your project:
Drop by the project during work hours: Your presence broadcasts your commitment to quality.

Establish a communication routine: Hang a message board on site where you and the project manager can leave daily communiqués. Give your email address and cell phone number to subs and team leaders.

Set house rules: Be clear about smoking, boom box noise levels, available bathrooms, and appropriate parking.

Be kind: Offer refreshments (a little hospitality can go a long way), give praise when warranted, and resist pestering them with conversation, jokes, and questions when they are working. They’ll work better when refreshed and allowed to concentrate on work.

More tips on planning a kitchen remodel:

Plan, plan, plan Keep the same footprint Get real about appliances Don’t underestimate the power of lighting Be quality-conscious Add storage, not space
Read more:  http://members.houselogic.com/articles/tips-for-kitchen-remodeling/preview/#ixzz2vTYMvuYK Follow us: @houselogic on Twitter | houselogic on Facebook

FHA 203k and Fannie Mae Renovation loans

  • When is the appraisal ordered on a FHA 203k and Fannie Mae Renovation loans? We do not order the appraisal until the detailed Scope of Work is completed and signed by the buyer and the contractor. The appraisal is performed Subject-To the After-Improved value. On FHA 203k you get up to 110% of the After-Improved value which means a 10% buffer. All repairs are done AFTER CLOSING.
  • What happens if the utilities CANNOT be turned on with a property because of leaks, extended vacancy, etc? With the renovation loan we would include the cost of any necessary repairs AND we will always keep at least 15% contingency money in the case there are additional repairs needed. Example – Cost of work = $10,000. Contingency would be at least $1,500. For homes that have been vacant for least 12 months – JEA will require an electrical inspection and city inspection prior to activating the power or water.
  • How is the down payment calculated on a FHA 203k loan? The minimum 3.5% down payment is calculated off the sales price of the house plus the cost of rehabilitation or repairs. Example: $100,000 sales price + $15,000 repairs = $115,000 x 3.5% = $4,025. A buyer can certainly choose to have a larger down payment but these are the minimums.
  • Are Renovation loans – FHA 203k and Fannie Mae Homestlyes – good for Refinances too? Yes. You can Refinance & Renovate which means not only lowering your interest rate, but also including the cost of improvements as well. 3 great advantages:
  • Appraisal is based on After-Improved Value
  • FHA 203k – you get up to 110% of the after-Improved Value.
  • Closing costs can be financed into the loan
  • On FHA 203k and Fannie Mae Renovation loans can the buyers act as their own contractor? While the guidelines on some versions of the loans allow for “Self Help”, both HUD and Fannie Mae discourage the practice because of the level of risk. The guidelines call for the buyers to be licensed/insured contractors AND there are NO upfront monies provided for materials. So, the buyers must prove the ability to perform the job in workmanlike manner AND have sufficient funds for both the loan and repairs. There are other guidelines that restrict the amount of work that can be done in a “Self Help” transaction.

FHA 203k loan or Fannie Mae renovation loans

On FHA 203k loan or Fannie Mae renovation loans, what happens if there are more repairs than expected after completing the inspections? There are several options depending on the seller of the property:
  • If it’s an REO/short sale thus an As-Is property, you can simply back out of the contract based on the inspection contingency.
  • You can also continue with the REO transaction and request the seller reduce the sales price based on the property conditions. However, you must assume the bank will NOT make an changes since the property is being sold As-is. If the repairs affect the health & safety of the property you might see some relief.
  • At times,  you can ask the REO bank to make certain repairs that affect the livability of the home. This can be time consuming since they will require several estimates. In addition, Fannie Mae often has a contractual clause that allows them to raise the sales price to address the repairs. This is NOT needed if you simply use a renovation loan.
  • If the buyer is past the inspection period per contract and still needs to back out of the contract based on property conditions, we can use the Financing Contingency to cancel the transaction and get the Binder Deposit returned.
  • If its a traditional resale then the seller could either make the repairs, reduce the sale price or cancel the transaction based on the proeprty conditions.
  • Why would someone NOT get approved for a HomePath or HomePath Renovation loan? HomePath loans are conventional loans thus much more restrictive when it comes to qualifying. Here are some of the factors that can be restrictive and also require additional monies down:
  • Credit – you must have stronger and deeper credit. at least 660-680 to start (without 20% down).
  • Property type – Condos are much stricter/riskier and thus the automated underwriting  (DU) will often not approve buyers for condos unless they have strong credit and/or larger down payments.
  • Down payment – If the buyer is putting 3-5% down it is going to be much stricter than if they are putting 20% down. It’s a simple layer of risk issue.
  • Debt-to-income ratio – Fannie Mae loans are much stricter than FHA and generally cannot exceed 45% DTI regardless of the buyer’s overall profile.
  • Rates – HomePath loans have numerous additional overlays when it comes to pricing rates which often leads to higher interest rates and a higher costs to even get a rate.
  • Does using a FHA 203k or Fannie Mae renovation loan help with getting lower insurance rates? YES! Not only can it make the difference of even getting insurance on certain properties, it allows the buyer to get better insurance rates based on the after-improved condition of the property. For more details on this please contact me via phone or email.

FHA 203k and Fannie Mae renovation loans

  • How do you know the amount of money to include for repairs in a FHA 203k or Fannie Mae conventional loan? For the sake of getting an initial loan approval we either make an educated guess on repair costs or submit a loan to qualify for the MAXIMUM loan amount. However, when the Scope of Repairs (SOR) if finalized we simply edit the loan to match and update all numbers for the buyer. They key is getting that initial credit approval without waiting on the Scope of Repairs to be finalized.
    • ex: $150,000 sales price + $20,000 repairs = $170,000 loan for approval.
    • Final SOR comes in at $17,000 we adjust the loan to $167,000 prior to final approval and closing.
  • What happens if we Fannie Mae accepts our offer using a Homepath Renovation loan but it turns out FHA 203k was a better loan choice for the buyer? Simple edit. We can amend the contract to indicate buyer is using a FHA 203k loan. As long as Fannie Mae knows you are using the correct type of loan to get the property closed (renovation) they will allow you to edit the contract. Ideally, we will pre-approve the buyers prior to the offer so the initial contract is correct from the start.
  • What are the differences with when Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac is the seller on a REO property? Since they are officially government-backed agencies, both Freddie and Fannie are exempt from paying Deed Stamp Taxes unless specifically addressed on the REO contract addendum. In addition, much like a typical REO property, the seller will not pay the settlement fee ($450-$850) or survey ($350). NOTE – If the contract is written correctly, Fannie Mae will often pay up to 6% of buyers closing costs/prepaids (on owner occupied) and Freddie Mac will pay up to 3% of buyer’s closing costs/prepaids. Each property/asset manager can dictate what the bank will pay on behalf of the buyer.

For Sale 203K Renovation Projects in Jacksonville, Florida

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Green Cove Spring, Fl- Homes For Sale – Florida Homes – Homes For Sale

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This Beautiful Log Cabin Home For Sale in GREEN COVE SPR , FLORIDA  32043

 

Green Cove Spring, Fl Homes For Sale 203k Renovation Special

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Green Cove Spring Homes For Sale 203k Renovation Special 

 

 

 

Homes For Sale – Use The Wells Fargo Downpayment Assistance Neighborhood Lift Program & FHA 203k Renovation Loan for Upgrades

We're sorry, but we couldn't find MLS # 611200 in our database. This property may be a new listing or possibly taken off the market. Please check back again.

This a great Home To use the FHA/HUD 203k Renovation Program and the Wells Fargo Neighborhood Lift Program

Call Me Today  For a Showing (904) 348-0452

www.realtyhomecenter.com/

 

 

For Sale For Sale For Sale Home – Buy a Home In Jacksonville Fl – FHA 203k Short Sale Home

For Sale For Sale For Sale Home – Buy a Home In Jacksonville Fl – FHA 203k  Short Sale Home

Looking to Buy A Home that Need a Little TLC.. 10365 Shelby Creek North JACKSONVILLE  FLORIDA 32221 For Only.

This Home is a Great Candidate For FHA/HUD 203k Renovation Program.

Upgrade the Kitchen with New Cabinets and Counter Top. New Tile Floor in The Kitchen and, All New Appliances.

New Shingle Roof, Exterior Painting and Interior Wall Painting.

$ 84,900 on The Westside on Jacksonville Fl  .. Renovation Special

 

Call Me Today for a Showing …(904) 348-0452

www.Livinginjacksonvilleflorida.com

 

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